Committee to Protect Journalists Receives UN Accreditation

The United States has led a successful effort to grant United Nations accreditation to the Committee to Protect Journalists, a press freedom organization.

CPJ’s U.N. accreditation effort stalled in May when a subcommittee to the U.N.’s Economic and Social Council, which is responsible for accrediting nongovernmental agencies, turned down CPJ’s request after four years of bureaucratic delay.

As Tracy Wilkinson reports in the Los Angeles Times, “countries with abysmal human rights records, including Russia, China and Venezuela, took the lead in rejecting the CPJ” during the subcommittee vote in May. After the initial rejection, U.S. diplomats took up CPJ’s case and managed to bring it to a full vote before the 54 member states of the council, where CPJ was officially offered U.N. accreditation.

Accreditation will give the organization greater access to U.N. activities and resources, better allowing the CPJ to defend the rights of journalists and political dissidents in a world that has grown increasingly hostile towards the freedom of the press.

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