After the Era of Intervention: The Future of U.S. Foreign Policy

Eugene Gholz is an associate professor of public affairs at The University of Texas at Austin. His work focuses primarily on the intersection of national security and economic policy. He previously served in the Pentagon as a senior advisor for manufacturing and industrial base policy and he is co-author of the textbook US Defense Politics: The Origins of Security Policy.

In June 2015, he joined the Charles Koch Institute for a panel discussion on whether the United States’ current grand strategy is making the country safer.

Next week, Gholz will appear at Advancing American Security: The Future of U.S. Foreign Policy, a conference hosted by the Charles Koch Institute to facilitate an honest and open inquiry into our nation’s foreign policy. During Advancing American Security, Gholz will discuss the future of U.S. grand strategy, evaluate competing approaches, and consider the prospects for strategic adjustment alongside panelists Michael Desch and Michael O’Hanlon.

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