Extensive Cracking Closes $60 Million Texas High School Stadium

Everything is bigger in Texas, even government waste. In 2012, a high school in Dallas spent $60 million of taxpayer money on an 18,000 seat stadium. Now, just 18 months after construction was completed, the structure has been closed due to extensive cracks some ranging as much as three-quarters of an inch wide. That a high school would build such a stadium to begin with is mind boggling but a high school wasting taxpayer dollars on a structure that can’t even be used is much worse.

“District officials defended the cost — an eye-popping figure even in football-mad Texas, home to hundreds of schools playing under the ‘Friday Night Lights’ — by calling the stadium an investment for generations of future Eagles fans and a much-needed upgrade from the district’s previous 35-year-old field.”

A version of this blog originally appeared on CronyChronicles.org, a project of the Charles Koch Institute. The Institute republished it here on September 17, 2015.

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