Federal Government Spent $1.3 Million On Alcohol In 2013

According to The Washington Times, last year the federal government spent $1.3 million on alcohol. While there may be some legitimate expenses on drinks, when examined next to the comparatively meager $315,000 spent in 2005, the spending has quadrupled.

“’You could say that Washington’s quite literally drunk on other people’s money,’ said Jonathan Bydlak, president of the Coalition to Reduce Spending, a fiscal watchdog that advocates reduced federal expenditures. ‘This hits home because it relates to your own experiences and the way you would cut down on expenses in a situation like this. When someone’s out of work or generally struggling to get by, they understand that they have to cut back on these kinds of expenses.’”

A version of this blog originally appeared on CronyChronicles.org, a project of the Charles Koch Institute. The Institute republished it here on September 17, 2015.

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