Health Care on Delivery Highlights Regulatory Burden

Drones will soon deliver medicine and blood to remote areas in Maryland, Nevada, and Washington. California-based company Zipline, which began operations in Rwanda in July, is looking to equalize health outcomes in rural areas of the United States.

Amar Toor, writing for The Verge, reports that following Zipline’s partnership with Rwanda, the White House expressed interest in using Zipline’s services domestically. According to Toor, Zipline will likely receive an exemption from Federal Aviation Administration regulations and begin operations six months after that.

While this technology has the potential to vastly improve the quality of medical care in remote locations, Zipline’s need to seek approval or exemption from the FAA highlights an inhibitive regulatory structure that requires innovators to seek and receive approval.

Moreover, an approach that allows government to grant privileges to some while denying those privileges to others incentivizes cronyism. To truly allow for technology to save lives and improve well-being, regulators should strive for an approach of permissionless innovation to allow for open competition and faster adoption of new technologies.

More Blog Posts

05-20-2020 01:20pm

StoryCorps Connect During COVID-19: Finding a New Way to Share America’s Stories

StoryCorps pivots to digital to keep building connections between people during the pandemic.

Read more

05-19-2020 05:39pm

Free speech provides comfort during COVID-19 pandemic

Trying circumstances can also present opportunities for people to come together. When people feel as if they face a common challenge, differences and divisions begin to blur. That’s cause for optimism.

Read more

05-14-2020 11:20am

Five steps for public officials to protect public health, regain public trust, and ensure civil liberties during COVID-19 crisis

Americans and their public officials grapple with the dynamic while working to protect public health and maintain the public confidence necessary for successful adoptions of temporary measures and ultimately restoration of their full civil liberties. Charles Koch Institute Senior Fellow Casey Mattox offers advice on the subject.

Read more

Sign up for updates