Where Religious Toleration and Campus Free Speech Intersect

Christian universities have long been a part of the United States’ educational landscape, but Mary Eberstadt notes in The Federalist that there have been increasing “legal and other attacks on Christian colleges, Christian associations and clubs, Christian schools, Christian students, and Christian homeschooling,” including calls to deny accreditation to Christian schools.

For instance, Trinity Western University, a Christian university in Canada, is facing a difficult accreditation battle because of the code of conduct it expects its community members to abide by.

Christian clubs have also faced difficulties. The Christian Legal Society lost a 2011 Supreme Court case (CLS v. Martinez) over whether it could restrict the leadership positions in its club to those who were Christians.

While Eberstadt argues that secular “activists today do not tolerate genuine diversity, including and es­pecially in the realm of ideas,” she ends with a note of optimism:

“Today’s renewed interest outside religious quarters in the fate of free speech on campus is one hopeful sign that this, too, might pass, and maybe even that religious education may yet find allies it didn’t know it had—at least if consistency and tolerance are allowed to rule.”

More Blog Posts

05-20-2020 01:20pm

StoryCorps Connect During COVID-19: Finding a New Way to Share America’s Stories

StoryCorps pivots to digital to keep building connections between people during the pandemic.

Read more

05-19-2020 05:39pm

Free speech provides comfort during COVID-19 pandemic

Trying circumstances can also present opportunities for people to come together. When people feel as if they face a common challenge, differences and divisions begin to blur. That’s cause for optimism.

Read more

05-14-2020 11:20am

Five steps for public officials to protect public health, regain public trust, and ensure civil liberties during COVID-19 crisis

Americans and their public officials grapple with the dynamic while working to protect public health and maintain the public confidence necessary for successful adoptions of temporary measures and ultimately restoration of their full civil liberties. Charles Koch Institute Senior Fellow Casey Mattox offers advice on the subject.

Read more

Sign up for updates